What Your Credit Union Can Learn From Apple

A brand new version of Apple's mobile operating system, iO6 was unveiled this month. This new update introduced several new features, including a brand new Maps app. The only problem? People seem to hate it.

From Bloomberg Business Week:

New mapping software Apple is introducing this week with the iPhone 5 was criticized by technology gadget reviewers, who said it doesn’t provide directions for public transportation and sometimes gets confused when navigating users.

“Apple believes that they can deliver a better experience for customers than Google,” said Sarah Rotman Epps, an analyst at Forrester Research. “But in the short term, Google has a better mapping application, and iPhone customers will suffer.”

The consumer reviews on the new Maps app have been overwhelmingly negative. Today the CEO of Apple, Tim Cook, released an apology stating that the app will get better, but in the meantime users can use alternatives offered by competitor's Microsoft and Google.

We launched Maps initially with the first version of iOS. As time progressed, we wanted to provide our customers with even better Maps including features such as turn-by-turn directions, voice integration, Flyover and vector-based maps. In order to do this, we had to create a new version of Maps from the ground up.

There are already more than 100 million iOS devices using the new Apple Maps, with more and more joining us every day. In just over a week, iOS users with the new Maps have already searched for nearly half a billion locations. The more our customers use our Maps the better it will get and we greatly appreciate all of the feedback we have received from you.

This is a great learning moment. No matter how well-lauded your company is, at some point it will release a product or service that fails to meet customer expectation - and that's ok.

Our customer's satisfaction should be the barometer for success - if you release the best designed loan program ever invented but none of your customers can use it, you haven't succeeded.

The mark of a truly great company is how it acknowledges its shortcomings. When things go wrong (and inevitably, they do), be honest and open about it. Address your members and let them know that their voices are being heard. 

DeAndre